Posts

This post is about multi-group partial least squares path modeling (PLS-PM). There is already a useful list of references on this blog post. As the author noticed, ensuring measurement invariance is often thought of as a prerequisite before dwelling into multi-group comparison, at least in the psychometric literature that I am familiar with. From a measurement perspective, this is easily understandable since we need to ensure that we are indeed measuring in a similar way the exact same construct in specific subpopulation.

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Yesterday was my last day of academic teaching. Although I keep doing in-house or company training (statistical computing only), I’m done with my regular lectures for this year. It was a long journey since October as I was in charge of 4 courses (around 90 hours in total), plus extra training for a private company. During the same period, I managed to work on two textbooks (basically related to this course) while working hard to get things done at my work.

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Some quick notes from my recent activities and reading list. Although I am far less active that I used to be in the past (and that I would like to be currently), I still archive–when time allows–interesting things that happen on the web or that I found potentially useful for my work. The famous “Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs”, by Abelson, Sussman, and Sussman, is now live on GitHub.

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Here are some draft notes, written in 2015, unfilled but not lost forever. With slight edits to accomodate a proper archive blog post. R and psychometrics (February 2015) I have been using R for most of my statistical projects since 10 years or so. In the beginning it really was an awesome software for psychometric modeling because there were some nice packages for multidimensional and optimal scaling, IRT modeling, and factor analysis, which were otherwise not available, at least on OS X.

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Here is the latest bag of tweets*, which covers October 2015.

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I am always reluctant to download pre-release version when OS X get updated. So I waited for the final version of El Capitan in App Store. Apple Mail finally became a useable application in fullscreen mode: You can now start writing a message and go back to your inbox without having to close the editor window. It is now possible to have two fullscreen applications side by side (‘split view’ mode), and Spaces has been improved in many ways.

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Here are some resources to learn data cleaning techniques. While browsing Leanpub yesterday1, I came across this little book: Practical Data Cleaning, by Lee Baker. This is the second edition of a book that was updated on October 2015. The author assumes that data are managed using MS Excel, and emphasizes the importance of quality control and data trails. However, I find this book a little scarce as it merely fly over the main points of data cleaning and, in particular, does not discuss technical issues (except when suggesting some Excel function like TRIM() or SUBSTITUTE()).

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Here is the latest bag of tweets*, which covers September 2015.

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Here is the latest bag of tweets*, which covers August 2015.

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Some months ago I noticed the release of a new text editor which was supposed to bring the best of both world, Emacs and Vim, but see Spacemacs - First Impressions From an Emacs Driven Developer for a recent review. Spacemacs I tried Spacemacs yesterday and I must say this should be great for people used to Vim modal approach to interacting with buffer and text. However, I feel like it is too much for Emacs users (even with the Holy mode), and I stand on my custom settings.

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